Quit Tea Ingredients

Herbal tea selection of calendula, chicory, goji berry, elderflo

Quit Tea is a natural, healthy, smoking alternative. The herbs help to relieve stress and and anxiety, and temporarily support your willpower to get you through each craving. Some of the herbs are good for detoxing, helping to remove many of the harmful chemicals so you feel healthier sooner.

Herbs & Spices That Make Quit Tea Work!

Valerian Root

Valerian is most commonly used for sleep disorders, especially the inability to sleep (insomnia). It is frequently combined with hops, lemon balm, or other herbs that also cause drowsiness. Some people who are trying to withdraw from the use of “sleeping pills” use valerian to help them sleep after they have tapered the dose of the sleeping pill. There is some scientific evidence that valerian works for sleep disorders, although not all studies are positive.

Valerian is also used for conditions connected to anxiety and psychological stress including nervous asthma, hysterical states, excitability, fear of illness (hypochondria),headaches, migraine, and stomach upset. Valerian acts like a sedative on the brain and nervous system.

Early research suggests that taking 600 mg of valerian for 7 days reduces blood pressure, heart rate and feelings of pressure when under stress. Other research found that taking 100 mg before speaking in front of an audience reduces feelings of anxiety. Another study found that taking a combination product containing valerian and lemon balm night lower anxiety caused by stress at low doses but increase anxiety when taken in larger doses. There is contradictory evidence about the effectiveness of valerian for anxiety. Some people have reported that it seems to reduce stress in social situations.

Valerian Root
Skullcap

Skullcap

Skullcap is a plant. The above ground parts are used to make medicine. Skullcap is used for many conditions, but so far, there isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine whether or not it is effective for any of them.

Skullcap is used for trouble sleeping (insomnia), anxiety, stroke, and paralysis caused by stroke. It is also used for fever, high cholesterol, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), rabies, epilepsy, nervous tension, allergies, skin infections, inflammation, and spasms.

The chemicals in skullcap might work by preventing swelling (inflammation). Other chemicals in skullcap are thought to cause sedation (drowsiness).

Holy Basil

Holy basil is a plant. It is originally from India and is used in Ayurvedic medicine as an “adaptogen” to counter life’s stresses. It is considered a sacred plant by the Hindus and is often planted around Hindu shrines. The Hindu name for holy basil, Tulsi, means “the incomparable one.” Medicine is made from the leaves, stems, and seeds.

Early research found that taking 500 mg of holy basil leaf extract twice daily after meals for 60 days reduced anxiety and associated stress and depression in people with anxiety. In early research, taking 400 mg of a holy basil extract (M/s Natural Remedies Pvt. Ltd, India) by mouth in the morning and 800 mg at night for 6 weeks decreased symptoms of stress, including forgetfulness, sexual problems, exhaustion, and sleep problems.

holy basil
oatstraw

Oatstraw

Oatstraw (Avena sativa) is the herb of longevity in the Auryuvedic system of India. It restores nervous system integrity, emotional flexibility, and sexual flow. Oats and oatstraw are exceptionally good at nourishing heart health and moderating cholesterol.

Oatstraw infusion builds deep energy for the next day, especially when you have been riding an emotional roller coaster. Oatstraw nourishes the nerves, easing anxiety and improving our ability to live with uncertainty.

Red Clover

Red clover is a low-growing, flowering plant commonly found in fields, meadows and other undisturbed grounds. Like many other members of the legume family, red clover contains isoflavones and coumarin compounds, the latter of which are partly responsible for the sweet taste of the flower tops that bees enjoy visiting and people enjoy in salads and teas. Together with the flowers, the somewhat bitter leaves are used in tea blends. Red clover flowers and leaves are also used to make infusions and extracts for use in skin and hair preparations.

Red clover’s constituents are thought to stimulate the immune system. (It has been a traditional ingredient in many formulas for cancer.) Red clover has also been used to treat coughs and respiratory system congestion, because it also contains resin. Resinous substances in plants have expectorating, warming, and antimicrobial action.

red clover flower
sarsaparilla root

Sarsaparilla Root

Sarsaparilla is a term many people associate with a soft drink that was particularly popular in American west in the 1940s and 1950s. Today, however, the soda’s tang is largely due to artificial flavorings rather than natural sarsaparilla root. In addition to flavor, all of the vine-like plants in this genus contain several active compounds in their roots, including a variety of minerals and antioxidants such as stigmasterol, kaempferol and quercetin. While powdered sarsaparilla is usually added to baked goods and beverages or taken in capsule form, the dried root is tinctured or used to make teas and syrups.

Chemicals in sarsaparilla might help decrease joint pain and itching, and might also reduce bacteria. Other chemicals might combat pain and swelling (inflammation), and also protect the liver against toxins.

Burdock Root

Burdock is a member of the daisy and sunflower family, although its appearance immediately indicates its place in the thistle group of plants. Attractive and sturdy, burdock is most likely to be found on the roadside and other undisturbed places. The “dock” portion of its name speaks to the large, downy leaves of the plant, which are used fresh to make poultices or harvested and dried to make bitter teas and tonics. While the entire plant contains antioxidant compounds such as quercetin and inulin, they are concentrated in burdock roots collected from first year plants.

In traditional medicine, the fruits, seeds, roots, and leaves of burdock have been used as decoctions or teas for a wide range of ailments including colds, catarrh, gout, rheumatism, stomach ailments, cancers, and as a diuretic, diaphoretic and laxative. It has even been promoted as an aphrodisiac.

burdock
ginger root

Ginger Root

This Asian perennial is one of the world’s most popular spices. The fresh root is used in Asian and Indian cuisines and also lends a pungent, spicy note to herbal teas. Because ginger root contains volatile oils with warming properties, it is sometimes used to make salves and ointments. Dried ginger is also very aromatic and sharp on the tongue, as well versatile. The chopped root is added to teas, soups and other foods, while the powdered root is a common baking spice.

Research suggests that taking a supplement containing ginger, rhubarb, astragalus, red sage, turmeric, and gallic acid daily for 8 weeks does not increase weight loss or reduce body weight in people who are overweight. Research suggests that administering 120 mg of ginger extract daily for 21 days increases the number of days without ventilator support, the amount of nutrients consumed, and reduces the time spent in intensive care units in people with sudden respiratory system a failure.

Clove Buds

Clove is a spice that comes from an evergreen tree in the myrtle family that is commercially cultivated in Indonesia, Madagascar, Pakistan and Zanzibar. The clove, which resembles a nail with a head, is the dried calyx of the undeveloped flower with the embryo seed attached. They are not hand-picked as many other spices are, but are beaten or shaken from the tree. Whole cloves are used in cooking, potpourri and other crafts and to make tinctures. The ground spice is primarily used in baking.

Clove buds may serve as digestive aids. Eugenol, the primary active compound in clove buds, may soothe the lining of the stomach, preventing indigestion and abdominal pains.

clove buds
cinnamon ground

Cinnamon

Cinnamon is a spice obtained from the bark of trees native to Asia and the Middle East, the grade of which depends on the species. One of the most popular spices in the world, cinnamon is used in virtually every world cuisine. Whole sticks are used in mulling spice mixes and potpourri, as well as in arts and crafts. The ground spice is use in baked goods, desserts and as a flavoring in teas, specialty coffees and other beverages.

Some research has found that a particular type of cinnamon, cassia cinnamon, may lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. However, other studies have not found a benefit. Studies of cinnamon for lowering cholesterol and treating yeast infections in people with HIV have been inconclusive.

Licorice Root

Licorice is a flowering shrub-like plant in the pea and bean family found throughout Asia and now naturalized in some parts of Europe. The herb’s genus name of Glycyrrhiza is derived from the Greek word glukurrhiza, which translates to “sweet root.”

Licorice is very soothing and softens the mucous membranes of the throat and especially the lungs and stomach and at the same time cleanses any inflamed mucous membrane that needs immune system support. . It reduces the irritation in the throat and yet has an expectorant action. It is the saponins (detergent-like action) that loosen the phlegm in the respiratory tract, so that the body can expel the mucus. Compounds within this root help relieve bronchial spasms and block the free radical cells that produce the inflammation and tightening of the air ways.

licorice root
fennel seeds

Fennel Seed

Fennel is a bulbous, flowering plant that is original to the Mediterranean region and now cultivated in India, Russia and France. From the feathery leaves to the large bulbous root, the entire plant exudes a licorice-like aroma. When cooked as a vegetable, fennel is sweet. The seed is equally pleasant, lending a warm, spicy-sweet aroma and flavor to foods and teas.

Fennel is used for various digestive problems including heartburn, intestinal gas,bloating, loss of appetite, and colic in infants. It is also used for upper respiratory tract infections, coughs, bronchitis, cholera, backache, bed wetting, and visual problems.

Stevia

Stevia is one of a family of plants that are native to South America and have been used for centuries to sweeten drinks and foods. Stevia leaves are said to be from 30 to 300 times sweeter than sugar * though the amount of sweetness varies from leaf to leaf and plant to plant. It is touted as a natural alternative to artificial sweeteners. To date, chemical analysis and studies show that the leaf adds no calories, has no harmful side effects and is more palatable with less aftertaste than any artificial, chemical sweetener to date. Stevia has been in wide use in South America for centuries, and in Japan since the government banned the use of artificial sweeteners. To date, no harmful side effects have come to light, making stevia one of the most promising sugar alternatives available. Stevoside, made from stevia, is approved as a food additive in Korea, and is widely available throughout China, Taiwan and Malaysia.

stevia leaf
black pepper

Black Pepper

Peppercorns are probably the oldest known and most widely used spice in the world today. This table companion to salt was once so highly valued that it was used as a form of currency, giving rise to the expressions “black gold” and “peppercorn rent.” Whole peppercorn adds peppery spice to sauces, soups and culinary vinegars. Ground to a course or fine texture, peppercorn, commonly referred to as just pepper, enhances the flavor of all kinds of foods, especially eggs, potatoes, tomatoes and cheeses.

Black and white pepper might help fight germs (microbes) and cause the stomach to increase the flow of digestive juices. There is conflicting evidence about their role in cancer. Some evidence suggests pepper might protect against colon cancer, but other evidence suggests it might promote liver cancer.

St Johns Wort

St. John’s wort is a perennial, meadow plant. Originally native to Europe it now grows in many temperate zones around the world. It is so-named because of its propensity to bloom on or near June 24th, or St. John’s Day. Hypericum, means “above” and “picture,” reflecting its historical use of being hung over a home’s entry door to deter malevolent spirits. St John’s wort has a myriad of traditional and modern uses.

There is some scientific evidence that St. John’s wort may be helpful in treating mild depression, and the benefit seems similar to that of antidepressants. However, two large studies, one sponsored by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), showed that the herb was no more effective than placebo in treating major depression of moderate severity; ironically, the conventional drugs also studied did not fare any better than placebo, either. NCCAM is studying the use of St. John’s wort in a wider spectrum of mood disorders, including mild depression.

 

St Johns Wort
oregano leaf

Oregano Leaf

Oregano is a perennial member of the mint family that is native to the Mediterranean region, as well as South America, Asia and Europe. The herb is widely used in Indian, Moroccan, Spanish, Mexican, Italian and Greek cuisines. Although oregano is generally thought of in most of the world as the standard pizza sauce seasoning, the flavor profile of the herb varies depending on species.

Oregano is used for respiratory tract disorders such as coughs, asthma, croup, and bronchitis. It is also used for gastrointestinal (GI) disorders such as heartburn and bloating. Other uses include treating menstrual cramps, rheumatoid arthritis, urinary tract disorders including urinary tract infections, headaches, and heart conditions.

Oregano contains chemicals that might help reduce cough and spasms. Oregano also might help digestion by increasing bile flow and fighting against some bacteria, viruses, fungi, intestinal worms, and other parasites.

Cayenne Pepper

Cayenne, also known as African pepper and bird pepper, is the dried fruit of a type of red pepper plant original to Zanzibar now cultivated in other temperate zones throughout the world. The member of the nightshade family gets its genus name, Capsicum, from the Greek word that means “to bite,” while the common name is borrowed from the capital city of French Guiana.

Pain from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis, psoriasis, shingles and nerve pain due to diabetes (diabetic neuropathy), when applied to the skin in the affected area. The active ingredient in topical preparations of capsicum, capsaicin, is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for these uses.

cayenne pepper

Warnings:

Some ingredients may cause drowsiness. Not recommended for use during pregnancy or while nursing. Consult your physician if taking medications, or if you have a medical condition.

Nicotine Addiction is a disease.

These statements have not been evaluated by Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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